As part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program I started working through the entire corpus of the Church Fathers. All 37 volumes.

I have just finished the first letter by Ignatius, The Epistle to the Ephesians. Not quite the page turner I always hope it will be. But there are some interesting points to bring up.

In this letter he appears to be arrested by authorities and will be delivered over to the executioners. He was apparently thrown to “the wild beasts” at Rome and “rent to pieces.”

It is hard for one to imagine in the West being tortured and beaten and ultimately killed all because of your faith. How many of us could truly say we would die for our faith?

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As part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program I started working through the entire corpus of the Church Fathers. All 37 volumes.

I have just finished the second letter in the series, The Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus. I have to say, this was an interesting read. And, upon finishing this letter, I found myself turning to the next, making slow and purposeful use of background information so I can ascertain the best context available.

Interestingly, I’ve found myself desiring to read these documents in chronological order, which is surprisingly different than the order they are arranged in. I actually should have left Mathetes for after Ignatius, since it was written around 130 A.D. (and Polycarp around 108 A.D.), but Ignatius proceeded both, at 100 A.D. It is trivial, yes, but the first thing I noticed in Polycarp was the reference to the “Catholic Church,” which is not mentioned previous in earlier letters.

But, more on that later. Right now, let’s jump into all things Mathetes and discover a faith like few found today…

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Awhile back, as part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program I embarked on a long desired task of reading the entire corpus of the Church Fathers. All 37 volumes.

As of today, I finished the first letter in the series, 1 Clement to the Corinthians. Although so far the extra biblical documents have been pretty drab and uneventful, at least 1 Clement is not as entirely devoid of purpose as say the Didache was. It was more like the Book of Enoch, in it had several interesting points, but overall was utterly and fitfully boring.

Despite this, let’s jump in and see what’s going on in the first century….

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