Welcome to my uThM Research Journal, a monthly summary and analysis of my coursework thus far. You can read more about it here.

You can read all of my journal entries here.

Let’s get started….

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I just finished my first official online course on Monasticism and Monastic Theology, part of my uThM Program.

I looked for awhile before I uncovered the free courses by Fr. Luke Dysinger, O.S.B at Saint John’s Seminary. The website is actually a treasure trove of courses and other resources available to the public.

You can check it out here.

Likewise, all of my coursework from my uThM Program can be found here.

I also keep a monthly Research Journal that analyzes and integrates what I’m learning. You can find that here.

So, let’s dig into my review of the online course, Monastic Spiritual Theology.

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This is my discussion assignment from the online course on Monasticism and Monastic Theology, part of my uThM Program. You can find the course homepage here.

Likewise, all of my coursework from my uThM Program can be found here.

I also keep a monthly Research Journal that analyzes and integrates what I’m learning. You can find that here.

So, let’s dig into my final assignment for this online course, Monastic Spiritual Theology.

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The Planet Earth Collection is a series of programs in 4K that cover the natural world on planet earth. It aired on the BBC for several years and also on the Discovery Channel.

I have been wanting to watch the series for years, and I’m glad I finally took the time to do so. It was a well produced documentary/nature show, with stunning visuals. I have posted my course assignment (a paper covering the nature of the series, angelic beings, life and death, and the coming new heavena nd earth. It’s now posted on my Patreon page. Check it out!

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The Theology Program is an online series of courses focused on the fundamentals of theology released in the early 2000. Despite the dwindling of the ministry over the years, I do believe this series is still very relevant and has some good information to sift through.

I found the first course rather engaging, especially completing the workbook after watching the lectures. I have posted the entire 25 page document on my Patreon page. Check it out!

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Most documents I write for my uThM program are posted on my Patreon page, allowing supporters exclusive access. This time around, though, I chose to post this review on the blog directly, as I thought it was important enough to serve as a public service announcement more than anything else. If interested, you can see other posts about my uThM here.
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First century Christians continued the public prayer patterns of the Israelites, praying at the temple multiple times a day. As Christianity separated itself, its own traditions were developed.

The Didache recommended praying the Lord’s Prayer three times daily. Within a century or two, this blossomed into seven times a day, and incorporated the Psalms and then hymns, etc.

My question is this:

The Daily Office today appears to be quite an elaborate undertaking with multiple books to refer to, with different schedules based on the time of year, the season, etc. Why has this specific tradition grown so complex? Why not just stick to the Lord’s Prayer? Why not just read from the bible seven or eight times a day?
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Welcome to a check-in of my Unschooled Master of Theology in Biblical Studies degree. This post is just to let you know what I’m up to.

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Welcome to a new article series where I will be talking about my Unschooled Master of Theology in Biblical Studies degree. Nope. I’m not crazy. Well. Not really. Okay, maybe a little.….

Back in the early 90’s, when I was about to graduate high school, I made the decision to go into the military mostly because they were offering $30,000 for school if I signed up for four years. To make a long story short, I did my first enlistment, got out, and went the route everyone said was the route to take. I returned home and started taking classes at the local community college.

Fast forward ten years, and I emerge from academia with a Bachelor’s Degree in History from a regionally accredited school. The $30,000 was spent, and I immediately found another online school that offered a Master’s Program, with the plan to teach at the college level.

That, though, is where my story kind of came off the rails and, maybe inadvertently, let me to what I’m doing today.

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