This is the last assignment for the Koinonia Institute course Science and the Bible. This course follows the KWL format and below are my answers for the seventh and eighth lectures titled: Beyond Newton. This is part of the coursework for my Unschooled Master of Theology program.

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This is the third of four assignments for the Koinonia Institute course Science and the Bible. This course follows the KWL format and below are my answers for the fifth and sixth lectures titled: Beyond Perception. This is part of the coursework for my Unschooled Master of Theology program.

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This is the second of four assignments for the Koinonia Institute course Science and the Bible. This course follows the KWL format and below are my answers for the thrid and fourth lectures titled: Beyond Coincidence. This is part of the coursework for my Unschooled Master of Theology program.

Ready to discover the true nature of our reality and what lies beyond it?

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As part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program I started working through the entire corpus of the Church Fathers. All 37 volumes.

I have just finished the second letter in the series, The Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus. I have to say, this was an interesting read. And, upon finishing this letter, I found myself turning to the next, making slow and purposeful use of background information so I can ascertain the best context available.

Interestingly, I’ve found myself desiring to read these documents in chronological order, which is surprisingly different than the order they are arranged in. I actually should have left Mathetes for after Ignatius, since it was written around 130 A.D. (and Polycarp around 108 A.D.), but Ignatius proceeded both, at 100 A.D. It is trivial, yes, but the first thing I noticed in Polycarp was the reference to the “Catholic Church,” which is not mentioned previous in earlier letters.

But, more on that later. Right now, let’s jump into all things Mathetes and discover a faith like few found today…

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This is the first of four assignments for the Koinonia Institute course Science and the Bible. This course follows the KWL format and below are my answers for the first two lectures titled: Beyond Time and Space. This is part of the coursework for my Unschooled Master of Theology program.

Ready to discover the true nature of our reality and what lies beyond it?

Let’s find out…

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After completing the last major online course at KI, I decided not to take up another lecture series until I made a good dent in my reading list. It’s been building in numbers over the last year or two and threatens periodically to avalanche when I least expect it.

So, I jumped in with both feet and have finished most of my backlog of books I’ve been working on. One of those is Clay Writer: Shaping in Creative Writing.

If you would like to read more of my book reviews and other coursework for my Unschooled Master of Theology Program, then click here.

So, let’s get started….

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I just finished another course at the Koinonia Institute and, so far, I’m finding the topical courses are not nearly as good as the systematic, contextual reviews of the biblical text by Missler himself.

This course was a two lecture briefing, but it was really odd how it’s title about Demons, and specifically 1 Timothy 4:1 where Paul states, “In latter times some will depart from the faith, giving heed to deceiving spirits and doctrines of demons.” But, throughout the course, there is actually little to no mention of demons!

I guess we can chock it up to lesson learned. It is a personal goal to complete all KI courses (at least those on my personalized Study Plan for my uThM Program).

So, let’s go through the Discussion Questions despite the glaring absence of the actual topic in question….

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The other day I received a comment on a review I did for one of the courses I had just finished. It was actually by Michael Patton from Credo House, and he asked if I’ve ever tried one of the courses on Credo Courses.

Well, I’ve been a fan of Michael’s since finding his Theology Program on Bible.org. I’ve finished two of the six courses in the program and really like them.

But, my research since starting my Unschooled Master of Theology Program has shifted toward the study of death, consciousness, and afterlife – not leaving much room for extraneous studies.

I looked at the website, though (I happened to get the internet working at the Eden property, but not very well), and I happened onto a lecture by J.P. Moreland about the soul. This fit in perfect with my current research, so I could justify the time, not to mention it was currently free!

When I got back to civilization today, the first thing I did was download the lecture and dig in. And, I have to admit, I was pleasantly surprised at what I found.

So, let’s take a deep dive into all things related to the existence of the soul, shall we?

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This afternoon I finished the Teaching Company course, Exploring Metaphysics. It’s been a long time since I started this course, maybe a year or more ago. But, due to the ability to incorporate listening to lectures while at work (as well as finish up the bulk of the discussion questions), I’ve been able to finally finish this one.

I took this course on as part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program. You can check out all assignments for this program here.

For now, let’s take a look at what’s so interesting about Metaphysics.

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This week I finished the Doctrines of Demons course by KI and figured I’d write up a review on it since it’s part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program. While you’re at it, you can also check out my other assignments here.

I have to say, so far I’ve been pretty disappointed with the quality of most online courses I’ve undertaken so far. I’m starting to wonder if the overall quality for courses these days is just really poor, or if maybe it’s the choices of topics I make in designing my uThM program in the first place.

I guess it’s a matter of really digging in and honing my research questions, struggling through the process of determining what it is I’m really trying to solve, all the while, focusing and refocusing my efforts (and course materials) until I strike a vein of gold and can mine for answers successfully.

This course, as the title describes, is supposed to be about “doctrines of demons.” Sadly, this is not what I discovered as I went through the lectures.

Interested? Let’s find out…

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This week I finished a Teaching Company course that I’ve had on my list for at least two years. I started it at first listening to it in my car during my commute, but stalled quickly. About six months ago, though, I changed my phone carrier and not only have a much larger harddrive on my new phone, but I also have unlimited internet. This means I’ve incorporated my phone into my learning process, using my phone in the mornings while undertaking manual labor (when at Eden), or all day while at work (since I can listen to lectures, podcasts, audiobooks while working in the office). This is how I’ve been able to finish the course, Exploring Metaphysics, and it’s opened up some interesting lines of inquiry for me in my studies.

While you’re at it, you can also read all of my other course assignments for my uThM Program here.

With this post, let’s dig in and work through the course Discussion Questions in Metaphysics!

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Awhile back, as part of my Unschooled Master of Theology Program I embarked on a long desired task of reading the entire corpus of the Church Fathers. All 37 volumes.

As of today, I finished the first letter in the series, 1 Clement to the Corinthians. Although so far the extra biblical documents have been pretty drab and uneventful, at least 1 Clement is not as entirely devoid of purpose as say the Didache was. It was more like the Book of Enoch, in it had several interesting points, but overall was utterly and fitfully boring.

Despite this, let’s jump in and see what’s going on in the first century….

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